Canada Stocks-china Data Helps Keep Tsx Steady; Blackberry Flat After Bid

() * With suburban growth around rail lines a “reality,” it’s up to provinces, municipalities and railways to make sure busy crossings are safe, Canada’s federal transport minister, Lisa Raitt, says. Looming federal regulations for level or at-grade crossings are meant to help local governments and railway companies strike deals on building improved rail crossings where they see fit, but Raitt says regulations won’t give Ottawa a bigger role. () * The Progressive Conservatives have prepared a proposal for Ontario’s Liberal government that would see at least eight new laws passed this fall – a bid to seize control of the province’s policy agenda in the buildup to an election expected next year. The Tories will offer to help fast-track several of Premier Kathleen Wynne’s bills, plus at least three of their own, party sources told the Globe and Mail on Sunday. () Reports in the business section: * BlackBerry Ltd’s latest business plan follows the same handbook used by scores of distressed companies before it. The strategy: simplify the business, drop certain product lines and cut costs mercilessly. * The Oregon coast could play a key role in helping to get Western Canada’s vast natural gas reserves out of the ground and on to ships destined for Asian countries that need it. At least two companies, Oregon LNG and Calgary-based Veresen Inc , are proposing to build liquefied natural gas terminals in Oregon for which Canadian natural gas would be the primary supply source. () NATIONAL POST * The New York Times editorial board is taking the Harper government to task for allegedly silencing publicly funded scientists, a strategy the Times says is designed to ensure oil sands production proceeds quietly. The strongly worded Sunday editorial comes as the PR fight over the proposed Keystone XL pipeline is heating up, with President Barack Obama yet to make a decision on whether to approve the project that would transport bitumen from Alberta’s oil sands to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Air Canada to Undertake Request for Proposals for Certain U.S. Regional Transborder Routes

“The launch of a request for proposals is an important next step in our regional airline diversification strategy and ongoing cost transformation program,” said Kevin Howlett, Senior Vice President, Regional Markets. “Over the past two years, Air Canada has made significant changes to its strategy and relationship with its regional partners, now all operating under the Air Canada Express banner. Most recently, we transferred the operation of our Embraer 175 aircraft to a regional carrier whose cost structure is more in line with the U.S. regional carriers, and as low cost operators continue to grow in the rapidly evolving North American regional markets, it is critical for Air Canada to take the necessary steps to ensure its cost structure in these markets is also competitive.” Air Canada currently has capacity purchase agreements with four regional airline partners: Jazz, Sky Regional, Air Georgian and EVAS. Air Canada is Canada’s largest domestic and international airline serving more than 175 destinations on five continents. Canada’s flag carrier is among the 20 largest airlines in the world and in 2012 served close to 35 million customers. Air Canada provides scheduled passenger service directly to60 Canadian cities, 49 destinations in the United States and67 cities in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Australia, the Caribbean, Mexico and South America. Air Canada is a founding member of Star Alliance, the world’s most comprehensive air transportation network serving 1,328 destinations in195 countries. Air Canada is the only international network carrier in North America to receive a Four-Star ranking according to independent U.K. research firm Skytrax that ranked Air Canada in a worldwide survey of more than 18 million airline passengers as Best Airline in North America in 2013 for the fourth consecutive year. For more information, please visit: www.aircanada.com . Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Information Air Canada’s public communications may include forward-looking statements within the meaning of applicable securities laws. Forward-looking statements, by their nature, are based on assumptions and are subject to important risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements cannot be relied upon due to, amongst other things, changing external events and general uncertainties of the business and the capital markets. Actual results may differ materially from results indicated in forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including without limitation, industry, market, credit and economic conditions, the ability to reduce operating costs and secure financing, pension issues, energy prices, employee and labour relations, currency exchange and interest rates, competition, war, terrorist acts, epidemic diseases, environmental factors (including weather systems and other natural phenomena, and factors arising from man-made sources), insurance issues and costs, changes in demand due to the seasonal nature of the business, supply issues, changes in laws, regulatory developments or proceedings, pending and future litigation and actions by third parties as well as the factors identified throughout Air Canada’s public disclosure file available at www.sedar.com .

dropped 3.5 percent after Morgan Stanley cut its rating on the stock. The Standard & Poors/TSX Composite Index rose 4.71 points, or less than 0.1 percent, to 12,811.18 at 4 p.m. in Toronto. The benchmark Canadian equity gauge has surged 5.6 percent this quarter and is up 3 percent in 2013. Trading volume was 3.3 percent above the 30-day average. The big news event today was BlackBerry, said John OConnell , chief executive officer with Davis Rea Ltd. in Toronto. The firm manages about C$600 million. The gains among phone stocks show the markets were overreacting to the threat of an entrance from foreign telecoms, he said. The S&P/TSX traded little changed for most of the morning session before the BlackBerry announcement sent the index up by as much as 0.2 percent. The companys shares erased an earlier drop to turn as high as 4.1 percent before finishing the day unchanged at C$9.08. $4.7 Billion Thats roughly in line with the $9 a share offered by a group led by Fairfax, its largest shareholder, in a tentative deal. The deal values BlackBerry at a 3.1 percent premium over its closing price last week.

Canada Stocks Rise on Wireless Carrier Rally, BlackBerry Deal

Fairfax closed up 1.1 percent at C$420.45. More generally, the market was encouraged by a slew of surveys that showed a burst of new orders for businesses in China and Europe, suggesting a rebound in those economies. In Germany, Merkel began trying to persuade her center-left rivals to keep her in power after her conservatives notched up their best election result in more than two decades but fell short of an absolute majority. The market remained focused on the Fed’s next steps after the U.S. central bank surprised markets last week by keeping its stimulus program fully in place. “Overall the tone is positive,” said Elvis Picardo, strategist and vice president of research at Global Securities in Vancouver. “There’s a lot of money on the sidelines. We’ve been telling our clients to get in.” The biggest gains were recorded in the telecoms sector. After top U.S. telecommunications companies declined to register for a Canadian wireless spectrum auction, shares of the major Canadian incumbents gained. BCE Inc advanced 1.3 percent to C$44.51, Rogers Communications Inc was up 1.2 percent at C$45.36, and Telus Corp rose 2.5 percent to C$35.44. “Now that concerns about foreign competition have waned, the sector is back again in focus,” Picardo said. “On that note, the Fed’s announcement last week has put some new life into dividend-paying stocks.” The Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index closed up 4.71 points, or 0.04 percent, at 12,811.18. It has gained about 5.6 percent this quarter.