Google Tests New Music Video Search Results

Treasure Trove Of Early 20th Century Folk Music Unearthed In Michigan

Google appears to be testing a new way to display the top search result for music videos. (Credit: Screenshot by YvoSchaap via Twitter) Music videos are no small potatoes for YouTube, and Google’s looking at making them bigger in Google Search results — literally. Related stories: Chrome for iOS learns pronouns As part of Google’s quest to more tightly integrate its different services, the company appears to be experimenting with how music videos appear in Google Search results, according to the blog Google Operating System . The top search result for a music video would be a significantly larger preview of the video itself, in the style of a Google Now card, with additional information such as the artist name, song title, album name, and year released. It’s not clear if the preview will let you play the video directly from the search results list, or if you’ll have to click through to YouTube. It’s also unclear whether Google will be opening this test to more people. A Google spokesperson would not confirm that changes were imminent, saying only, “We’re always experimenting with ways to make Search more useful, but we don’t have anything to announce.” Here’s how the search results look now for the same artist and song. (Credit: Screenshot by Google Operating System) Updated, September 23 at 11:30 a.m. PT with a statement from Google. Topics:

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The release is causing a stir among folk music fanciers and history buffs. “It was a fantastic field trip hardly anything has been published from it,” said Todd Harvey, the Lomax collection’s curator at the library in Washington. The Michigan batch contains about 900 tracks and represents a dozen ethnicities. Lomax, son of famous musicologist John A. Lomax, spent three months in Michigan on his research, which also took him through Appalachia and the deep South. He drove through rural communities and recorded the work songs and folk tunes he heard on a large suitcase-sized disc recorder powered by his car’s battery. The trip was supposed to cover much of the Upper Midwest, but he found so much in Michigan that he made only a few recordings elsewhere in the region. The collection includes acoustic blues from southern transplants, including Sampson Pittman and one-time Robert Johnson collaborator Calvin Frazier; a lumberjack ballad called “Michigan-I-O” sung solo by an old logger named Lester Wells; and a similar lament about life deep in the copper mines of the Upper Peninsula called “31st Level Blues,” performed by the Floriani family, who were of Croatian descent. The 250 disc recordings of about 125 performers, along with eight reels of film footage and photographs, reflect the rich mixture of cultures in Depression-era Michigan, where immigrants fleeing poverty and persecution in Europe and the South came seeking jobs. Natives of French-speaking Canada, Finland, Italy, Croatia, Germany, Poland, Ireland and Hungary perform the songs, which represent 10 languages. John and Alan Lomax’s archives at the library’s American Folklife Center encompass 10,000 sound recordings and 6,000 graphic images, documenting creative expression by cultural groups around the world. Most famous were the field recordings made in the South, including those of Leadbelly, Muddy Waters and Son House. “This fills in a big chunk of the top half of the middle section of the country,” says Laurie Sommers, an ethnomusicologist who serves as Michigan’s program coordinator for the Lomax project. “Now you have the stories and the sounds of sailors, miners and lumberjacks, ethnic communities who came to work … and brought their traditions with them.” One example is Exilia Bellaire, a woman from the Upper Peninsula community of Baraga who recorded “I Went to Marquette.” It’s sung in a mixture of French and English, and Harvey said the song is one of many that “captures (what) occurs when cultures interact with one another.” Lomax’s Michigan research proved to be challenging.

Why ‘Dexter’ Composer Used Human Bones for Music

However, there’s still plenty of unseen behind-the-scenes footage, including ET’s exclusive clip with composer Daniel Licht, who goes into detail on the show’s music. As the music is an integral part of sustaining the show’s suspense and horror, Licht and his orchestra intricately incorporated the show’s themes and moods into the music. PICS: Vote on the 2013 Emmys Fashion! “Every season, I try and take the music off on an adventure in the same way it takes the audience off on an adventure with Dexter,” Licht said as he recorded the soundtrack for the final episode of Dexter, which aired Sunday. Licht, who has composed the music for a few other shows and video games in addition to dozens of films, reveals that they added some Dexter-inspired objects to the orchestra that contributed to the depth of the music’s influence. “We also incorporated different sonic instruments. I started off with…human bones, just ’cause I thought that would be a very creepy thing to introduce,” Licht divulged. “…It was Season 4 that I introduced using surgical instruments: scalpelsbowing on themand hitting on autopsy pails.” VIDEO: ‘Dexter’ Cast Dishes on Finale, Potential Spin-Off Although the score featured some eerie instruments, most viewers likely had no idea that thematic items like human bones were used in the music. Nonetheless, Licht says it adds texture to the music and the show once the viewer discovers the disturbing behind-the-scenes bit of information. “[It’s] all sorts of stuff that if you heard it, you wouldn’t know, but…I want to add the extra layer of creepiness to the musicwhat the music is made from, you can think about that,” he said. Watch the exclusive video above for a behind-the-scenes look at Dexter’s music through the eyes of composer Daniel Licht.

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