Horror Movies: Why We Watch Them

That’s blessed news for a low-profit, family-run operation that has carried on the legacy of the late owner, Terry Mercille. Tonight (Monday), the theater six miles north of Potosi will celebrate with two free double features. The movies are the animated “Planes” and “Turbo” on Screen One, and the apocalyptic comedy “This is the End” and the horror movie “You’re Next” on Screen Two. The movies start at sunset, of course. A party and classic-car rally is planned for Oct. 5. By next year, the Hollywood studios will stop sending canisters of film to theaters, so without expensive digital projectors to show movies on hard drives, many independent exhibitors will go out of business. The digital transition has been especially hard on North America’s 400 drive-ins. Projecting an image onto a large drive-in screen requires a high-powered machine that could cost $80,000–a big investment for a seasonal business. This summer, Honda sponsored Project Drive-In as a promotional tie-in with the upcoming movie “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2.” It awarded digital projectors to the top five drive-ins in a national poll. Although the humble Starlite did not make the cut in the initial voting, Honda extended the offer to four more facilities, and today the Starlite got the joyous news. The other recipients include first-round winners in Saco, Maine.; Honor, Mich.; Graham, Tex.; McHenry, Ill. and Newburg, Ore.; and second-round winners in Elizabethtown, Tenn., Monetta, S.C.

Local drive-in wins contest, celebrates with free movies

Michael E. Thum DDS

Then I met my best friend. I can’t remember the first horror movie she talked me into seeing, but we had such a good time trying to scare each other during and after the movie that I decided to give the genre another chance. While I still don’t care for slasher movies, the supernatural ones get my blood pumping and my adrenaline going. I think the key to not letting myself get freaked out is to remember that while the film may claim to be a true story or may seem realistic, it’s only a movie. Even the “true story” films have to add drama to make it exciting, and many directors take great liberties with the real events. I remember watching The Blair Witch Project in the theater in 1999. As I had been lost in the woods in the dark before, the movie terrified me. Years later, when I was teaching at a community college, I showed the movie to my class on Halloween. Several students fell asleep and the ones who stayed awake through the whole thing were wholly not scared . Sure, what scares each person is going to be different, and the hand-held filming of The Blair Witch Project can’t hold much of a candle to the special effects-heavy flicks that are being made today. But why was I (still) so scared of Blair Witch? Why do I go pay good money to see scary movies? Why does anyone? The following list is compromised of horror movies that I have seen in the last year or so.