Italy Minister Gets Europe Support Against Racism

Somali jihadists recruit in U.S., Canada, Europe

The ministers signed a declaration condemning racism as anathema to Europe’s democratic principles. They also called for the continent to embrace diversity and for its politicians to be models of unity, not intolerance. They said the attacks that Integration Minister Cecile Kyenge has been subjected to were unacceptable and must stop, particularly because they have come from Italy’s political class. One member of Italy’s xenophobic Northern League has called the Congolese-born Kyenge a “Congolese monkey.” Another the Senate vice president likened her to an orangutan, and a third suggested on Facebook that she be raped so she would know what it feels like to be a victim of crime. Kyenge, an eye doctor who has lived in Italy since 1983, has responded to the attacks with reserve, saying it’s not for her to denounce them but for Italians and their institutions. On Monday, ministers and ambassadors from 16 other European Union nations answered on her behalf and condemned the attacks against her. “Political leaders must be models of unity, acceptance of diversity and tolerance, and not actors of division and intolerance,” the declaration read. Belgium’s deputy prime minister, Joelle Milquet, sponsored the initiative, after deciding the attacks against Kyenge couldn’t go unanswered. She said she was pleasantly surprised that so many countries quickly agreed to support Kyenge and sign the declaration, which also calls for a broader European pact against racism to be launched in January. “Our reaction as politicians was: ‘If this is how we are talking between us in the political class, imagine what the rest of society is saying,'” said Malta’s minister for social dialogue, Helena Dalli. She said she and her colleagues felt the need to “erase the harm” done by xenophobic Italian politicians and the “bad example” they set for the rest of society.

An armed police officer takes cover during a volley of gunfire outside the mall. Kenya mall attack >> Photos: Kenya mall attack “What we have learned for the last five years is we have to speak out against this,” Bihi said. Al-Shabaab breaks new ground with complex Nairobi attack In a message on its now-suspended Twitter page, Al-Shabaab named nine people it said were among the gunmen who stormed Nairobi’s Westgate Mall on Saturday. Three of them were from the United States and one each was from Canada, Finland and the United Kingdom, it said. “It isn’t totally surprising, given the fact that we know Shabaab has recruited in the United States,” CNN terrorism analyst Peter Bergen said Sunday. “We also know they have recruited in a number of European countries.” Bergen noted that the group’s Twitter page includes tweets in colloquial English, “the kind of English that an American, or perhaps somebody who grew up in the UK, would be using.” Al-Shabaab is fighting to implement a stricter form of Islamic law in Somalia, a struggle in which Kenyan troops have been directly involved since 2011. Kenyan troops wrested control of the key Somali port of Kismayo from the jihadists in 2012, and Somali government and African Union troops drove the group out of its strongholds in the capital Mogadishu in 2011. Tweets from @cnni/nairobi-attack As early as 2008, the FBI warned that more than a dozen youths, some of them American citizens, had left Minneapolis, home to the largest Somali population in the United States. At least three are believed to have carried out suicide bombings in Somalia, where an internationally backed interim government has taken tenuous root after two decades of civil war and near-anarchy. Minneapolis’ Somali community “is 100% against terror,” said Bihi. But he said a lot of families arrive owing “a lot of debt,” and community youth programs were “almost nil.” Al-Shabaab recruiters engaged teens by providing them entertainment and role models, then “brainwashed” them, he said. A senior State Department official told CNN that U.S. officials are trying to confirm whether the names released by Al-Shabaab are Americans, but said they are becoming more confident American citizens were involved in the Kenyan attack. The official said the administration has been concerned and raising alarm bells about Al-Shabaab recruitment in the Somali-American community for years and would be making decisions in coming days about additional efforts to stem the flow of recruits. How Al-Shabaab picks its targets In 2010, a federal grand jury charged 14 people in the United States with aiding Al-Shabaab.

Should Europe’s schools adopt a code banning cloud companies from data mining?

“Before we had the Microsoft Office suite for all the students and all the staff. We saved all our documents on a local server that was stored in a basement. There was no integration, no collaboration or anything,” said Cassne. The Data Inspector Board’s decision also casts doubt over several Chromebook pilot programs at schools in Sollentuna, which could lead to schools eventually replacing Windows-based PCs with the Google laptops. “That would help us even more and it’s looking really good but its the same issue there we have to have everything in place with Google,” said Cassne. According to Cassne, Sollentuna will now opt in to the set of model contract clauses that Google published late last year that was meant to offer Google Apps customers “additional compliance” with Europe’s 1995 Data Protection Directive. But, he admits, opting in probably won’t address the regulator’s problem with its use of Google Apps. The Data Inspection Board earlier this year banned the Salem Municipality from using Google Apps in government. It too opted in to Google’s additional contract, but a final decision on whether it can continue to use the service depends on the outcome of an appeal in a Swedish district court. It’s not clear yet whether Sollentuna will appeal the Data Inspection Board’s decision, which requires that it either sign a contract with Google that complies with the Data Protection Act, or stop using the service altogether. Sollentuna is working with Google to resolve the issue, said Cassne, but it’s unlikely Google will amend its contracts to comply with Swedish law. Ingela Alverfors, a lawyer for Sweden’s data protection authority, confirmed to ZDNet that opting in to the model clauses definitely will not enable compliance with Sweden’s Data Protection Act.