Local Drive-in Wins Contest, Celebrates With Free Movies

HORROR MOVIES UNCUT FRIDAY SEPTEMBER THE 20TH

The movies are the animated “Planes” and “Turbo” on Screen One, and the apocalyptic comedy “This is the End” and the horror movie “You’re Next” on Screen Two. The movies start at sunset, of course. A party and classic-car rally is planned for Oct. 5. By next year, the Hollywood studios will stop sending canisters of film to theaters, so without expensive digital projectors to show movies on hard drives, many independent exhibitors will go out of business. The digital transition has been especially hard on North America’s 400 drive-ins. Projecting an image onto a large drive-in screen requires a high-powered machine that could cost $80,000–a big investment for a seasonal business. This summer, Honda sponsored Project Drive-In as a promotional tie-in with the upcoming movie “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2.” It awarded digital projectors to the top five drive-ins in a national poll. Although the humble Starlite did not make the cut in the initial voting, Honda extended the offer to four more facilities, and today the Starlite got the joyous news. The other recipients include first-round winners in Saco, Maine.; Honor, Mich.; Graham, Tex.; McHenry, Ill. and Newburg, Ore.; and second-round winners in Elizabethtown, Tenn., Monetta, S.C. and Ocala, Fla.

Michael E. Thum DDS

In tandem with this restructuring, funding agencies started asking filmmakers to think about audience demographics and box-office appeal a which, in turn, forced many to look at casting international stars to promote sales in international territories. The result of these policy and programming shifts can be seen in the this yearas TIFF program as Canadians not only look outside our borders for talent, but for content as well. aA significant trend Iave noticed over the past few years Iave been programming is seeing more and more Canadian filmmakers going outside our borders to different parts of the world to tell their stories,a says Agata Smoluch Del Sorbo, a Canadian programmer who watched 260 submissions before settling on the handful of Canadian features in the 2013 TIFF lineup. aLast year this was particularly noticeable,a she says, pointing to the India-set Midnightas Children and Oscar-nominated Rebelle, set in Africa. aItas something weave seen in the past, but itas happening more frequently now. This year, this global trend has taken a slightly different shape, but itas still there.a Smoluch Del Sorbo offers a few examples: Richie Mehtaas feature Siddarth is set in India and tells the story of man searching for his son, Robert Lepageas Triptych criss-crosses Europe and Quebec and thereas even Filthy Gorgeous, a Canadian documentary about Penthouse magazine mogul Bob Guccione. Combined with the likes of Mark Peranson and Raya Martinas Mexico-shot La Ultima Pelicula, which tells the story of film crew trying to shoot the Mayan Apocalypse, first-time director Gia Milanias All the Wrong Reasons, which features the late Cory Monteith as a big box employee, and Terry Milesas Cinemanovels starring Jennifer Beals, thereas no doubt the trend toward cultural cross-pollination has been growing stronger ever since news of an U.S. version of the 2011 Quebec comedy Starbuck was in the works starring Vince Vaughn. Even Don McKellar is back with an English-language take on La grande seduction starring Canadaas latest contribution to Hollywoodas hunk factor, Taylor Kitsch. Smoluch Del Sorbo thinks itas a very natural trend for Canadian filmmakers. aCanada is an incredibly multicultural place and filmmakers have deep roots in or strong connections to different parts of the world,a she says. aWe also have filmmakers who see a clear need for an important foreign or global story to be told and they have the means and skills to do so and provide a new and valuable perspective.a Whatas happening in Canada is part of a larger trend worldwide. Technological change has paved the way for simultaneous release dates across several continents, and the rise of China as a potential market has forced filmmakers to think in more international terms.

Canadian movies take pride of place on TIFF’s international stage

Two long term friends are traveling through the desert when their truck breaks down. After finding out it was a ploy by Fogler to start a conversation with Duhamel the two erupt into a battle of life call outs and relationships with not only women but passions of the past. Scenic Route turns into a bloody, dark humours buddy flick that would have been what really happened in Due Date. I really enjoyed this movie and the dark turn it takes at the very end really completed the film. I was upset when this hit limited theaters and did not head our way but im glad its available to take home now. It wont be on my top horror films of the year list but it may end up on my top films to see in general this year. Pick up Scenic Route this weekend as I think you will really enjoy it. 4/5 PARANORMAL ASYLUM- This is the worst movie on the list this week and really was a pain to watch. From start to finish there was a luminous effect that held through the movie. It became really annoying and so did the interaction with the spirits. The film had slight potential when it started but as soon as the evil started Asylum went downhill from there. I like that they story involved the Typhoid Mary tale but the film became stale and pointless as soon as it introduced the dark spirit. Stay away from this one folks as the film clocks in around an hour and forty five minutes so unless you don’t want to lose that time stay away.1/5 WORLD WAR Z – Read my review for World War Z here, I really enjoyed World War Z and was anxious to see how it would translate to the home audience. So far so good as we live in an age of big televisions so big blockbuster films work at home too.