Ryder Cup: United States Banking On Tom Watson’s Leadership At Gleneagles

Watson is one of golf’s living legends with eight major championship victories, including five Open Championships. The 64-year-old previously skippered his country to victory at The Belfry in the 1993 Ryder Cup and has been brought back for a second stint in charge at Gleneagles next year as the United States look to turn around their recent poor form at the biennial event. Tom Watson has one year until the start of his captaincy of the American Ryder Cup side with dreams of ending the losing streak. The Americans have won just two of the last nine Ryder Cups and suffered a final-day meltdown at Medinah in 2012 when they managed to lose despite leading 10-6 going into the singles. Bishop, who was involved in the appointment, cited Watson’s ability to handle the media and his rapport with the Scottish public – he won four of his Opens north of the border – as positives for the United States. He told Sky Sports: “When we were going through the interview process I talked to players that played for Tom on the ’93 team at The Belfry. “They talked about the leadership role that he took as a captain. He had the players’ backs the entire week, there were a few things that came up that could have been distractions to the players, Tom took care of that. “I think he’ll divert a lot of media attention to himself, away from our team. “And the other things is: he’s revered in Scotland. We’re going to be the opponents and the Europeans will have the home-crowd advantage but there’s a dynamic there that that will be a little bit favourable for our team.” Europe defend the Ryder Cup at Gleneagles from September 26-28 next year.

Why Is the United Nations in New York Anyway?

Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images In addition to the issues discussed each year at the U.N. General Assembly, the meetings themselves, and the arrival of the world leaders who attend them, always create a certain amount of their own drama. Though it wont quite top the comedy of the time Muammar al-Qaddafi rented land from an unwitting Donald Trump, or the terror of the time the Secret Service almost accidentally shot Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, but this years main UNGA subplot revolves around Sudanese President Muammar al-Bashir , who seems intent on coming to New York despite calls by human rights groups for him to be arrested and shipped to the Hague to face trial for genocide. Its not clear yet whether the U.S. government, which is not a member of the International Criminal Court but has turned suspects over to it in the past, has granted Bashir a visa to attend the event, as it is generally required to under the original 1947 basing agreement . Its not entirely unreasonable to wonder why this should be the United States headache at all. Americans, are ambivalent at best about the effectiveness of the organization their tax dollars fund nearly a quarter of. The countrys outstanding debt to the U.N. has been settled to a large extent under the Obama administration, but in the past, its gotten so bad that Ted Turner has had to open his checkbook . New Yorkers, in particular, bristle at the worse-than-normal Manhattan gridlock caused by the annual meeting, the restrictions on movement around U.N. headquarters, and the $5 to $7 million worth of security arrangements required–not to mention the year-around annoyance of U.N. diplomats ignoring tens of millions of dollars in unpaid parking tickets. And with recent reports about the extent of U.S.

The United States’ Obscene Wealth Inequality

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WalMart: Home of the modern-day lords and their serfs Contrary to the use of food stamps by the needy in the past to supplement assistance programs for those who could not work, many working families now rely on SNAP to survive, because the income from their jobs keeps them at or below the poverty level. This is true for many workers and especially so for those who work in the big retail chains. For example, the salary of a WalMart Sales Associate ranges from $7.47 to $10.77 per hour. Consequently those with full-time status, defined as being employed for 34 hours per week for 52 weeks per year, earn only $13,200 to $19,000 per year: a salary that puts them well below the poverty level of $23,000 per year for a family of four. Nevertheless, WalMart has fought all proposals to raise the minimum wage in the US. Given that WalMart currently employs 1.2 percent of the US workforce in the private sector, one could say that a significant part of SNAP serves to subsidize Walmart. That is not all. Many WalMart employees also rely on Medicaid and other government programs for anything approaching a decent standard of living. Indeed, taxpayers are estimated to subsidize WalMart to the tune of $900,000 per store, per year. By contrast to the dire poverty of those who generate WalMarts wealth, if we put aside Forbes official list of the super rich and do some of our own math, it immediately becomes evident that Number One (Bill Gates) and Number Two (Warren Buffet) are rather puny compared to Walmarts owners. Specifically: Christy, James, Alice, and S. Robson Walton hardly stand out in the Forbes gallery of the super rich at the relatively modest rankings of Number Six through Number Nine, respectively, but their net worth adds up to an obscene $136 billion: that is, $6 billion more than the fortunes of Gates and Buffet combined. Charity for profit As for the nominal Number One: his fortune seems to defy all physical laws, having grown from $9.35 billion in 1994, when he became a philanthropist , to $72 billion today.