Sorry, Kelly Clarkson, Jane Austen’s Ring Stays In Uk

A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. 5 To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Sorry, Kelly Clarkson, Jane Austen’s ring stays in UK Maria Puente , USA TODAY 5:10 p.m. EDT September 23, 2013 Kelly Clarkson’s dream of owning Jane Austen’s ring is over; it’s staying in the U.K. Kelly Clarkson at the Grammy Awards in February, wearing her replica Jane Austen ring. (Photo: John Shearer John Shearer/Invision/AP) Story Highlights Fans of the divine Miss A raise the cash to keep her bauble in the U.K. Pop star Kelly Clarkson loses gracefully SHARE 147 CONNECT 16 TWEET 5 COMMENTEMAILMORE It is a truth universally acknowledged that an antique ring once owned by Jane Austen would have to stay in the U.K., even if purchased by an American pop star. Austen worshipers in Britain are celebrating today at news that the Jane Austen’s House Museum has raised enough money to keep Austen’s ring in the U.K.. That means singer Kelly Clarkson, the first American Idol winner, can’t take possession of the gold-and-turquoise bauble she bought at auction last year and hoped to wear as her engagement ring. British media are reporting with some glee that Clarkson has been “thwarted” in her desire to take the ring to the USA, after the Austen museum announced it had raised more than 157,000 pounds (about $248,000) to meet the conditions of the export ban slapped on the ring by the British government. “The museum has raised enough cash to buy the ring and save it for the public in the U.K.,” crowed The Guardian . Clarkson was gracious in defeat. “The ring is a beautiful national treasure and I am happy to know that so many Jane Austen fans will get to see it at Jane Austen’s House Museum,” she said in a statement . Like most countries with deep reserves of art and antiques (but not the USA), Britain can block the export of items it considers national treasures. Anything belonging to the divine Miss Austen is considered sufficiently rare, if not outright sacred, to keep in the country, since very little else owned by Austen remains.

UK should return to Bulgaria

40 Thracian plain 4 copy

Having once been very popular in the UK, Bulgaria spent years in the wilderness following declining quality towards the end of the communist era. However, current winemakers argue that the wine industry is back on its feet again and deserving of a second chance. Its very important to bring belief in Bulgarian wines back to the UK market, Milko Tsvetkov, owner of Villa Yustina, told the drinks business on a recent trip. Were making good wines again. Good quality and good value, echoed his trade director, Petya Angelova. Equally striving for better quality is Krasimir Patishanov, general manager of the Brestovitsa co-operative. During his three years in charge he has introduced new, in-winery, bottling lines and encouraged his growers to reduce yields something that the co-op has been encouraging for the last 15 years. The consumers in the UK need to come back to Bulgaria because the wines have the quality and are developing at a good price. Patishanov also made the case for indigenous grape varieties such as Mavrud and Rubin arguing that they offered a new experience in their own right and were interesting grapes to blend with international varieties. Theyre good enough to compare with international varieties, he said, and they make blends unique. Merchants welcome blends because its something interesting and new. We dont need to produce something that has already been done and only Bulgaria can offer these (native) varieties. Kalin Martinov, CEO of Starolets winerys owner MK 2004, continued: Its a dream to be back in the UK but only with good quality wines. In the last few years there have been new players and theyre investing in new technology and equipment.