‘star Wars’ Origins: Which Characters Should Get Their Own Movies?

Smoluch Del Sorbo thinks itas a very natural trend for Canadian filmmakers. aCanada is an incredibly multicultural place and filmmakers have deep roots in or strong connections to different parts of the world,a she says. aWe also have filmmakers who see a clear need for an important foreign or global story to be told and they have the means and skills to do so and provide a new and valuable perspective.a Whatas happening in Canada is part of a larger trend worldwide. Technological change has paved the way for simultaneous release dates across several continents, and the rise of China as a potential market has forced filmmakers to think in more international terms. Look at your local multiplex. The landscape has changed: Martial arts stars play opposite Yankee action heroes, French ingenues star in Middle Eastern family dramas and directors such as Ang Lee shoot Life of Pi and other Canadian bestsellers on location in Taiwan. The push toward a more global marketplace is constant and palpable, but veteran Canadian filmmakers such as Bruce McDonald and Bruce Sweeney say the quirky Canadian tradition that features flawed men, potent women and a curious lack of special effects is still possible. aIf youare asking for $8 million, the financial people in the industry are going to want a famous person to drive the financing,a says McDonald, who returns to TIFF with The Husband, 25 years after making his festival debut with Roadkill. aIf you want the big toys … you have to be ready for that,a he says. aThatas whatas great about this movie. Itas a mix of veterans and new faces.

The 44-year-old actress – who has received several accolades including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and two BAFTA awards – may be one of the most wanted stars in Hollywood, but she feels she needs to stop agreeing to appear in so many movies. Speaking to the Metro newspaper, she said: ”I think there are way too many films made and I’ve probably made way too many films. But I do think there’s something about live performance that is compelling. It reveals what it means to be human. ”It’s a very intimate, connective art form. That’s why I do it. All of the stuff – ”What are you wearing? Who do you like kissing the most?” – that goes along with it doesn’t interest me in the least. But the art form does interest me.” Blanchett – who has previously starred alongside the likes of Brad Pitt, George Clooney and Matt Damon – insists she’s not interested in big-budget blockbusters and just prefers to work alongside great actors instead. She explained: ”In my career, I’ve never wanted to get anywhere in particular. I just wanted to work with interesting people on interesting projects.”

That’s why there should be a movie to explain this. A movie about Tarkin would be a movie about the rise of the Empire itself as well as an origin of the Death Star. It might as well be called Star Wars: Death Star. Who wouldn’t want to see a movie called Star Wars: Death Star? Who should play Tarkin? Would anyone turn down the chance to watch Christoph Waltz, as Tarkin, connive his way through the ranks of the Empire to become one of the most powerful men in the galaxy? (OK, yes, I’m aware that’s extreamly wishful casting.) With a Tarkin movie, this provides access to pretty much every member of the Empire, including Darth Vader. As for Tarkin’s polar opposite in the Rebel Alliance: Mon Mothma “We are hoping to form an alliance in the senate to stop the chancellor from further subverting the constitution.” These are the words spoken from Mon Mothma during a deleted scenes from Revenge of the Sith. Also, it’s insane to me that all of Mon Mothma’s scenes in Revenge of the Sith were cut. When Mon Mothma showed up during Return of the Jedi, an 8-year-old me thought to myself, Oh, she must be important. This is what’s insane to me: Grand Moff Tarkin and Mon Mothma have so much to do with the Galactic Empire and the Rebel Alliance, respectively, yet their roles in the prequels are next to nothing. Like Tarkin, the name of a Mon Mothma movie could be called Star Wars: Rebel Alliance. Who would not want to watch a movie called Star Wars: Rebel Alliance?. But, seriously, why create two such interesting characters that obviously have so much influence and do nothing with them? Anyway, I understand the world we live in and I understand, in 2013, what governs movies that are made.

Horror movies: Why we watch them

I can’t remember the first horror movie she talked me into seeing, but we had such a good time trying to scare each other during and after the movie that I decided to give the genre another chance. While I still don’t care for slasher movies, the supernatural ones get my blood pumping and my adrenaline going. I think the key to not letting myself get freaked out is to remember that while the film may claim to be a true story or may seem realistic, it’s only a movie. Even the “true story” films have to add drama to make it exciting, and many directors take great liberties with the real events. I remember watching The Blair Witch Project in the theater in 1999. As I had been lost in the woods in the dark before, the movie terrified me. Years later, when I was teaching at a community college, I showed the movie to my class on Halloween. Several students fell asleep and the ones who stayed awake through the whole thing were wholly not scared . Sure, what scares each person is going to be different, and the hand-held filming of The Blair Witch Project can’t hold much of a candle to the special effects-heavy flicks that are being made today. But why was I (still) so scared of Blair Witch? Why do I go pay good money to see scary movies? Why does anyone? The following list is compromised of horror movies that I have seen in the last year or so.